More on Mohr: his final Asheville, North Carolina days

  • L.J. Davenport Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences, Samford University
  • Kenneth J. Wurdack Department of Botany, Smithsonian University

Abstract

German-born Charles Mohr (1824–1901) spent most of his adult life working as a pharmacist in Mobile, Alabama. In addition, he contributed multiple scientific and popular articles on the botany of the Southeastern United States. Suffering from many physical ailments, he sought treatment in thermal baths and cool climates, including Asheville, North Carolina. There he was able to work with botanists at the newly established Biltmore Herbarium. In early 1900, he and his family moved to Asheville, where he completed reading the proof of his magnum opus, Plant Life of Alabama. He died in Asheville 17 July 1901—two weeks before his book was published—and is buried there.

References

Alexander, B. 2007. The Biltmore Nursery: A botanical legacy. Natural History Press, Charleston, SC.
Beadle, C.D. & F.E. Boynton. 1901. Revision of the species of Marshallia. Biltmore Bot. Stud. 1:3–10.
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Davenport, L.J. 1988. Charles Mohr, botanist. Alabama Her. 10:32–45.
Davenport, L.J. 2015a. From Cro-Magnon to Kral: A history of botany in Alabama. J. Bot. Res. Inst. Texas 9:397–431.
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Mell, P.H., JR. 1896. The flora of Alabama, part V: Leguminosae and Rosaceae. Bull. Alabama Agric. Exp. Sta. 70:276–296.
Mohr, C.T. 1887. Letter to E. A. Smith from Mobile, AL, 26 May. W. S. Hoole Special Collections, University of Alabama.
Mohr, C.T. 1890. Letter to N. L. Britton from Mobile, AL, 13 May. New York Botanical Garden Archives.
Mohr, C.T. 1896. Letter to E. A. Smith from Mobile, AL, 14 Nov. W. S. Hoole Special Collections, University of Alabama.
Mohr, C.T. 1897a. Notes on some undescribed and little known plants of the Alabama flora. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 24:19–28.
Mohr, C.T. 1897b. Letter to S. M. Tracy from Mobile, AL, 02 May. Smithsonian Institution Archives, Samuel Mills Tracy Papers, 1895–1914.
Mohr, C.T. 1899a. Letter to Marsha T. Tracy from Asheville, NC, 15 Sep. Smithsonian Institution Archives, Samuel Mills Tracy Papers, 1895–1914.
Mohr, C.T. 1899b. Notes on some new and little known plants of the Alabama flora. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 26:118–121.
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Mohr, C.T. 1900. Letter to S. M. Tracy from Asheville, NC, 04 Jun. Smithsonian Institution Archives, Samuel Mills Tracy Papers, 1895–1914.
Mohr, C.T. 1901. Plant Life of Alabama: An account of the distribution, modes of association, and adaptations of the flora of Alabama, together with a systematic catalogue of the plants growing in the state. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 6:1–921. Also published (with additions) as Geol. Surv. Alabama Monogr. 5.
Mohr, H.B. 1901. Letter to S. P. Langley from Asheville, NC, 14 Jul. Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Pollard, C.L. 1901. Letter to F. W. True from Asheville, NC, 13 Aug. Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Published
2021-07-23
How to Cite
Davenport, L., & Wurdack, K. J. (2021). More on Mohr: his final Asheville, North Carolina days. Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, 15(1), 121-124. https://doi.org/10.17348/jbrit.v15.i1.1054